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The Osteo Report September 2019


According to the latest research, almost 10 million people in the UK now live with osteoarthritis. A quite staggering figure. 

Given its prevalence, it’s perhaps unsurprising that it’s regularly the focus of news articles, blog posts and videos, many of which touch on the latest scientific research. 

Each month, the Flexiseq team scours the web for the osteoarthritis-related stories that have caught our eye. 

Here’s our latest roundup…

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We didn’t think we’d find ourselves writing about Kim Kardashian in the Osteo Report but then the millionaire reality TV star, other half to Kanye West, revealed that she’s been living with the autoimmune conditions psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. 

In an article for Poosh, the 38-year-old shared images of the red patches that have flared up during 13 years living with the skin condition and revealed how her hands and body have been affected by the associated arthritis. 

According to Versus Arthritis, one in five people who have psoriasis are likely to develop psoriasis arthritis, which can lead to pain, swelling and stiffness in and around joints

Her message is a positive one: “You can’t let it ruin your life or get the best of you. You have to do what you can to make sure you are comfortable but not let it take over.” 

We hear you, Kim. 

Closer to home and Craig Revel Horwood, a former Strictly Come Dancing colleague of Flexiseq ambassador Len Goodman, has gone public on his ongoing osteoarthritis battle. 

The 54-year-old, a professional dancer and choreographer, initially thought he'd suffered knee ligament damage only for tests to reveal severe osteoarthritis. 

With a better understanding of the problem, he's now on the mend and a patron of the National Osteoporosis Society.

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It’s a question that often gets asked. Do you need to stop running if you’re diagnosed with arthritis? Many people assume that exercising will exacerbate joint pain and stiffness. However, new research adds to increasing evidence that the opposite is true. 

Runner’s World, relays the results of a study in the British Journal of Sport Medicine and carries quotes from its author, Alessio Bricca, who states: “People with knee osteoarthritis must be reassured that therapeutic exercise prescribed to prevent or treat symptomatic knee osteoarthritis is safe and, if anything, could improve cartilage composition. 

He adds: “Instead of rest and activity avoidance, these people should be encouraged, reassured, and supported to engage in physical activity.”

If you’re inspired to take up running, you should definitely check out the testimonials of participants who represented Versus Arthritis in the Great North Run earlier this month. 

The emotional stories of James Hansford and Helen Pattison should be enough to get you off the sofa and into your trainers. As the race took place three weeks ago, you’ve got nearly a year to train for the next one!

What’s that? You want to take up something a bit more exciting? How about kickboxing? 

The Mirror carries the amazing story of a 76-year-old grandmother, Jean McKenzie Baldwin who despite having two knee replacements and arthritis has been nicknamed ‘The Beast’ by trainers because of her fearsome reputation in the ring.

Jean took up the sport after her husband died and is now looking to win her first fight.  “I love kickboxing,” she says. “It’s so invigorating. Even though I’m full of arthritis I feel absolutely great. It’s will-power more than anything, and pride actually.” 

Amazing stuff. 

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Finally, for today, the government announced earlier this month that they intend to invest over £130 million in new tech to tackle cancer and debilitating illnesses, including arthritis. 

Speaking about the investment, which can’t come soon enough, Business Secretary Andrea Leadsom said: “Chronic and painful illnesses like arthritis and Parkinson’s are dreadful and prevent people from living a full life. Curing these kinds of debilitating illnesses is one of the great challenges we face globally, and today’s commitment will play a vital role in ensuring that our scientists and thinkers have the tools they need to find new treatments that will support people to lead longer, healthier lives.”

Further Reading

Tips for Working With Arthritis

How to sleep better when you have osteoarthritis